Wednesday, 31 May 2017

A 7-hour flight with a 30-week bump

We leave as two, and will return as three...!

I've been MIA from posting lately as I've been busy getting settled into London life for the final stretch of my pregnancy... But despite the delay, I thought it would be worth writing about my experience of travelling whilst heavily pregnant, as it may be helpful or interesting for some of you.

So, we flew from Dubai to London exactly 10 days ago, when I was 30+1. In the days leading up to our departure I had my final appointment at Medcare Women & Children's Hospital with my OB-GYN, during which I passed the dreaded GTT (glucose tolerance) test with flying colours, and the doctor issued me with a 'Fit to Fly' certificate to present when asked by the airline during my impending travels. It's generally required by all airlines from 26 weeks of pregnancy onwards, but you may even be asked to show it earlier than that depending on how pregnant you actually look.

My doctor also prescribed me an Innohep injection to be taken just before flying; it's used as a 24hr blood thinner to prevent the risk of DVT (deep vein thrombosis) and is recommended before  any flight of over 4hrs in the later stages of pregnancy. Mine was administered at the hospital by a nurse into my thigh at 11pm, before a 5am flight the next morning. I didn't feel any effects of it and it's apparently a very normal injection with minimal risk of any side effects, so I was more than comfortable to take it.

The prospect of a 7hr flight from Dubai to London rarely fills anyone with joy, but factor in being really quite pregnant and also having booked a connecting flight via Doha rather than travelling direct, and it is safe to say I was rather looking forward to the whole transit part being over. I made sure to wear my most comfortable Topshop maternity leggings, a big baggy sweater, and my absolute favourite shoes to wear during pregnancy: Yeezys. I know they're overhyped and overpriced but there is really nothing more heavenly for those swollen pregnant feet.

Checking in at the Qatar Airways desk in Dubai International Airport was a breeze - even with our total of 100kg luggage between my husband and I - and nobody even seemed to notice I was preganant. The flight to Doha was a short and sweet 1 hour in First Class, but once we arrived in Doha the fun and games began. A shepherd from the airport was waiting for us as soon as we stepped off the plane, and proceeded to hurry us to the other side of the terminal - without a buggy - as he said our connecting flight was waiting for us. He also didn't notice I was pregnant and was rushing ahead whilst I struggled to keep up. We finally reached the boarding gate with much huffing and puffing on my part, and the shepherd informed us that there may not be time to transfer our baggage from the first plane to the second as the transit time was so short. Great.

We raced through the gate, believing that we were the only two holding up the entire flight, only to find that takeoff was to be delayed by at least an hour for a totally unrelated reason. So we rushed for nothing, and I sacrificed a bathroom trip for nothing. We sat in the holding pen at the gate with all other passengers for over an hour, with no access to any bathrooms - the worst prospect to face when you have a 1.5kg baby nestling against your bladder!

Eventually we boarded and yet again nobody from the airline appeared to even notice I was pregnant - so my Fit to Fly certificate went totally unused. As soon as we reached cruising altitude I reclined my seat to the flat position and proceeded to sleep for 5 of the 7 hours in the sky. I also made sure to stay hydrated and drink plenty of water throughout the flight, plus I requested ice cold towels a few times to soothe my feet, which are tending to overheat at any altitude these days.

Upon landing at Heathrow things were nice and smooth - both of us breezed through border control and our baggage - which thankfully had had enough time to be loaded onto the plane during the delay - was the first to roll off the carousel. Excited to be home in London and to see my mother, my energy levels were good for the remainder of the day, but when it came to bedtime I was absolutely exhausted from the exertions of the trip and spent much of the night and the next morning virtually comatose.

Overall it wasn't a bad experience at all taking a long haul flight at 30 weeks pregnant, although a direct flight would've been more convenient in general. I didn't suffer any aches or pains or new symptoms as a result of flying, but of course I was fortunate enough to be flying First and Business class so I had plenty of space to get comfortable, and I think an Economy seat would be far more difficult to deal with during pregnancy. So if, like me, you must fly in your third trimester, it's definitely worth it to book as high a class as your budget can stretch to (or do some great hustling work to get an upgrade!) for the sake of your baby and your body. 

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